Named Localities

Following on my last post about choropleth maps and regional densities, here are a couple of quick figures showing specific named locations at the city level and below (‘bare’ mentions of nations and regions/states alone are excluded) in the same nineteenth-century literary corpus, scaled by number of occurrences:

Localities AllYears

The biggies are New York, D.C., Boston, London, Paris, etc. Compare this to the log version, which seemed more useful in the density case:

Localities AllYears Log

Looks to me like the log version is less clear for this type of figure.

A few notes:

1. These figures include all the texts from 1851-75; still working on year-by-year figures and an animation. Won’t be hard.

2. A couple of things to check out in the near future. (a.) How does the density of named localities compare to that of named regions and nations? Consider Africa in particular, where there’s decent national density in some cases, but perhaps less geographic specificity. (b.) I need to produce a state-level density map that subtracts some measure of population from the number of named location mentions to get a sense of which states received a disproportionate share of literary attention.

3. These maps were produced using the ‘maps’ package in R. Really simple to use. Method cribbed from Nathan Yau’s Visualize This.

4. The top few cities:

Place Count
New York, NY, USA 9183
Washington D.C., DC, USA 4179
Boston, MA, USA 3951
Paris, France 3312
London, UK 3279
Rome, Italy 2154
Philadelphia, PA, USA 2058
New Orleans, LA, USA 1580
Richmond, VA, USA 1152
Jerusalem, Israel 925
Charleston, SC, USA 885
Baltimore, MD, USA 709
San Francisco, CA, USA 682

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